Being believed: How Denise Clair has challenged views of rape

PhD student Emma Forbes writes about the implications of landmark civil ruling “Devastated, upset and confused.” That’s how Denise Clair felt in July 2011 when she learned there was to be no prosecution of the two men she had accused of rape: footballers David Goodwillie and David Robertson. This month, some six years after the incident … Continue reading Being believed: How Denise Clair has challenged views of rape

Aim higher: protecting Scotland’s prison education in an age of austerity

For the past two years, SCCJR’s PhD students and staff have been part of reading groups in prisons in Scotland. We meet monthly and read social theory and political theory, philosophy, politics, human geography, linguistics and more. These are challenging academic texts, at the upper postgraduate level of comprehension. When I describe the prison reading … Continue reading Aim higher: protecting Scotland’s prison education in an age of austerity

A compassion deficit? How immigrant detention in the UK masks humanity

Professor Mary Bosworth provided an urgent, impassioned and at times startling account of immigrant detention as she delivered this year’s SCCJR annual lecture, warning there is “not just a legitimacy deficit but a compassion one” when it comes to the treatment of detainees. At the end of the week in which it was announced that … Continue reading A compassion deficit? How immigrant detention in the UK masks humanity