Scottish Penal Reform since Devolution: Reflections and Prospects for Change

By Dr Katrina Morrison, Lecturer in Criminology at Edinburgh Napier University and Board Member at Howard League Scotland The 20th anniversary of the opening of the Scottish Parliament allows us to pause and reflect on the progress of penal reform in this time. While criminal justice was under the jurisdiction of Scottish administrative structures prior … Continue reading Scottish Penal Reform since Devolution: Reflections and Prospects for Change

Thinking about organised crime in different academic contexts

By Valentin Pereda Aguado, a visiting PhD student from the Centre of Criminology and Sociolegal Studies based at the University of Toronto  To promote the development of original research, doctoral programs in social sciences encourage apprentice scholars to think critically about their research subject and to study a broad range of theories that approach particular … Continue reading Thinking about organised crime in different academic contexts

Social scientists and lawyers diggin’ the archives

Lessons learned from the Traces of Law Symposium By Aura Kostiainen, a visiting PhD candidate from the University of Helsinki What happens when a lawyer or a social scientist goes to the archives? A growing number of legal scholars and social scientists, or socio-legal researchers, are becoming enthusiastic about archival research. There are, however, some … Continue reading Social scientists and lawyers diggin’ the archives

Escaping the revolving doors: rethinking short-sentences and our use of prisons in Scotland

By Rebekah Cameron, Student at the University of Glasgow’s School of Law If you based your understanding of prisoners in Scotland solely on information relayed in the popular media, you would likely come to believe that our 8,000-strong prison population is mostly made up of murderers, sex offenders, and other highly violent evil-doers who pose … Continue reading Escaping the revolving doors: rethinking short-sentences and our use of prisons in Scotland

Desisting in Prison or Desisting Prison?

By Dr Sarah Armstrong, Director of SCCJR and Senior Research Fellow, University of Glasgow Lila Kazemian (John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York) presented a recent SCCJR@Glasgow working lunch, one of several talks on her recent book, Desisting in Prison. In introducing herself Dr Kazemian noted her slightly unusual training in criminology which … Continue reading Desisting in Prison or Desisting Prison?